The Warp-Weighted Loom- Book review

Audur Hildur Hákonardóttir A thank you note read at the book opening event in Bergen City library  December 16th 2016. “The key to understanding why words and images from spinning and weaving are still in use even after we have entered the forth dimension world and the digital age, when the majority of Western women…

Reproducing a vararfeldur

Varar- or Röggvarfeldur   My project for this time staying ast the Textile Center, Blönduós, Iceland is making a vararfeldur. The first to reproduce a real vararfeldur were Hildur (hope to meet you sometimes somewhere in real), who is part of this wonderful Northern-Women-Project, Elizabeth from Shetlands and Marta from Norway. They wrote about their…

Cowichan Knitting: History and Continuity

In this post I will focus on the a bit more on the background history of the Cowichan knitters and their techniques and how contemporary artists are responding to this history and honouring it.

Höskuld´s cloak and the “social skin”

I am really bored with what I am weaving at the moment, and can’t stop thinking about a passage in Njál´s Saga, which explicitly suggests that in the Norse cultural world, weaving cloth was connected to birth, life, fate, and a person’s being and essence.

Feldur by Hildurhak

The word feldur is Icelandic and means a skin from a living or a dead animal.

The Cowichan Women’s traditional sweaters, issues of intellectual property and cultural appropriation.

A flurry of media reports concerning the Cowichan Tribe’s claim that their famous sweater designs were being used illegally by the Hudson’s Bay Company for the 2010 Olympics held in Vancouver, BC Canada raised important issues around intellectual property and cultural appropriation. The outcome of the issue highlights the limits of legal, artistic and economic protection for creators of cultural products in this age of globalization.

Warping a warp weighted loom

In December 2015 a good friend gave me her old warp weighted loom, these photos document the adventure of learning to set it up, warp it, and weave with it.